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Insulation Contractors Washington DC

Looking for Insulation Contractors in Washington? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Washington that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find Insulation Contractors in Washington.

MidPark Services
(202) 462-1204
55 Quincy Pl., NW
Washington, DC
 
Tech Painting Co., Inc
(703) 684-7702
1406-B Leslie Ave.
Washington, DC
 
Broncos Drywall
(202) 391-1767
4713 Montgomery Pl
Beltsville, MD
Services
drywall contractor, drywall installation, drywall repair, drywall, remodeling contractor, kitchen remodeling, bathroom remodeler, home remodel, house painting, and painting contractor.
Hours
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Mon - Fri

MarcParc Inc
(202) 464-2900
1233 20th St., NW
Washington, DC
 
Discount Energy Services
(202) 545-0024
Washington, DC
 
MarcParc Inc
(202) 464-2900
1233 20th St., NW
Washington, DC
 
Handyman Services of Northern Virginia
(703) 237-0390
2850 Greenway Blvd
Falls Church, VA
 
MidPark Services
(202) 462-1204
55 Quincy Pl., NW
Washington, DC
 
Tech Painting Co., Inc
(703) 684-7702
1406-B Leslie Ave.
Washington, DC
 

HandymanWire -Miscellaneous Insulation Questions and Answers



Noise Reduction

Noise reduction


I have a problem with noise from outside in the house. I have hard wood floors. My house is old and has plaster walls and wood exterior. I've upgraded the windows and have insulated attic, but that has not helped. I'm thinking of having insulation shot in the walls but I've been warned that can be a nightmare down the road. Are the any inexpensive fixes you can suggest, or any sites I should be looking at.

The insulation in the walls will certainly help. Where do you live? Insulation is usually a good idea anyway(except where you don't need heat or air conditioning) I do not know what the nightmare down the road will be...... what have you heard??

Amount Needed

Insulation

We are currently having a house built in Southern New Jersey. It was recommended to increase the
insulation in the ceiling from R30 to R38 and in the walls from R13 to R15. The builder came back
with an additional cost of $650 for the walls and $400 for the ceiling. The house is 2 stories with
approximately 2100 square feet. I am looking for a recommendation as to the validity in what we are
doing and what you think of the cost. Would we save enough in our heat and cooling bills to justify the cost?

Without crunching the numbers considering surface area etc., I would bet that the increase in 2 R on the wall is NOT worth it. The ceiling most likely is. How did he propose going to 15R from 13R??

ALL insulation is worth it. It just becomes a question of how long to recover initial cost. If you plan to stay in you house a few years, you will see the recovery in your heating bills tough you may not even recognize it. Though 60% of heat loss is through attics and floors,the other 40% is through walls. Any increase is helpful.
I was once a fanatic about this sort of thing....
Doing some rough figuring, using an 85% efficient furnace, I figure the savings of going from 13R to 15R is about 26 gallons of oil a year. That would be about a 25 year payback.... That isn't much... typically you would like to make your investment payback in 5 years.


Insulation

I recently bought a raised ranch. There are two bedrooms over the garage that are always cold. I removed the ceiling from the garage and I found that there was R-8 insulation installed with the paper side down (facing you from the garage). There are also heat ducts for the two aforementioned rooms that are uninsulated (forced hot air heat). The beams are 2 x 8. House was built in 1964, steel beam construction. My questions are as follows: 1. Obviously, the ceiling is not properly insulated.... What would be the best way to insulate the garage, which R-value would be correct? Should the ducts also be wrapped before the batts are installed? 2. Should the paper-faced side of the batt face the floor of the room above or face the garage? I'm confused about this. 3. Would it be o...

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